Tuesday, November 6, 2007

Glamorama

Glamorama , by Bret Easton Ellis
$10.17 at Amazon.com
ISBN: 0375703845
Bret Easton Ellis is one of the leading writers of Generation X. He tells grisly stories of modern alienation like American Psycho and The Rules of Attraction. His characters tend to be psychotic, violent, as well as incredibly rich and good-looking. Glamorama is no exception.
Victor Ward is a 27-year-old male model who is opening a famous night-club in New York City. No expense will be spared to make it as glamorous as possible, and all his connections are being called in to pack the dance floor with as 
many A-List celebrities as he can find.
Unfortunately, all this excess costs him a bundle, and as opening night arrives, he's become desperately short on funds. This is when he receives a mysterious visit from a private investigator with a peculiar proposal. Victor is to be paid handsomely to travel to Paris and London in style. There, he will locate one of his many starlet ex-girlfriends, and persuade her to come home.
This seems like a dream come true for a shallow party-boy like Victor. A few weeks partying in Europe alongside a sizable chunk of change in his bank account is just what the doctor ordered. Naturally, it's not quite so simple. On his quest, Victor becomes involved with a league of international terrorists who kidnap and torture him and to fulfill their diabolical mission. An exciting and terrifying adventure story follows. Lots of sex, drugs, and Ellis' patented, depraved 
torture scenes.
Personally, I've enjoyed all of Ellis' novels. They move fast, and they're incredibly steamy. Most of them are rather non-linear and abstract, however; while Glamorama has a gripping, fully cohesive story that kept me eagerly turning the pages.
This novel is filled with dark humor, not suitable for young children or those suffering from heart conditions. The rest of us will enjoy reading along as a rich asshole gets manipulated by people who are much more clever than he is.
Being wealthy and connected isn't all it's cracked up to be. 

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